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"Salt Bride": What happens when an Israeli artist leaves a dress in the Dead Sea?









 



"Salt Bride": What happens when an Israeli artist leaves a dress in the Dead Sea? 


“It looks like snow, like sugar, like death’s embrace; solid tears, like a white surrender to fire and water combined."
 The images, now on display at the Marlborough Contemporary gallery in London, depict the crystalline transformation of a dress submerged for a period of time in the salt-rich Dead Sea.

“It looks like snow, like sugar, like death’s embrace; solid tears, like a white surrender to fire and water combined,” said Landau.

Soaking in the abundant salt and minerals in the waters of the Dead Sea is known to have various health benefits, but what would happen to a garment left immersed in the hyper-saline water for a prolonged period of time?

Israeli artist
Sigalit Landau has documented the astounding results of the experiment at the lowest point on Earth in her eight-part photography series 'Salt Bride.'
The dress, inspired by a traditional garment worn in the film The Dybbuk, became so heavy that it couldn’t be lifted out of the water, leaving behind fragments up to this day. So instead, Landau created a separate sculpture, a bridesmaid’s dress with the same effect. ‎

Landau’s love for the Dead Sea also resulted in an earlier project, wherein she released 500 floating watermelons and floated naked with them.

Salt Bride is currently on exhibit at 
Marlborough Contemporary in London.
(h/t: Jerusalem Post Israel News)

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